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Spider Vein Treatments

Advanced Vein Care, Anaheim Hills, California, Orange County California - for the medical doctor treatment of varicose veinsSclerotherapy

Sclerotherapy can be used to treat both varicose and spider veins. A tiny needle is used to inject the veins with a medication that irritates the lining of the vein. In response, the veins collapse and are reabsorbed. The surface veins are no longer visible. Sclerotherapy relieves symptoms due to varicose and spider veins in most patients. With this procedure, veins can be dealt with at an early stage, helping to prevent further complications.

You may need anywhere from one to several sclerotherapy sessions for any vein region. Depending on the type and number of veins being treated you may have one to many injections per session. Generally, normal activities can be resumed after sclerotherapy. Medically prescribed support hose and/or bandages may need to be worn for several days to several weeks to assist in resolution of the veins. The procedure, performed in the doctor's office, usually causes only minimal discomfort. Bruising and pigmentation may occur after sclerotherapy. Bruising typically disappears within 1-2 weeks. Although pigmentation almost always fades, it can last for several months. Scarring and other complications are rare.

Sclerotherapy is a procedure used to treat blood vessels or blood vessel malformations (vascular malformations) and also those of the lymphatic system. A medicine is injected into the vessels, which makes them shrink. Sclerotherapy is one method, along with surgery, radiofrequency and laser ablation (LES-VIEW, for treatment of varicose veins and venous malformations. In ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy, ultrasound is used to visualize the underlying vein so the physician can deliver and monitor the injection. Sclerotherapy should be done under ultrasound guidance after venous abnormailities have been diagnosed with duplex ultrasound. Sclerotherapy under ultrasound guidance and using microfoam sclerosants has been shown to be effective in controlling reflux from the sapheno-femoral and sapheno-popliteal junctions.

We do not use saline injections for sclerotherapy.

Hypertonic saline was one of the first sclerosants used. While effective, it tends to be very painful when injected and there is a higher incidence of hyperpigmentation (brown spots) of the skin. There’s also a greater likelihood of skin necrosis (skin wounds).